Tibor Nagy Urges US-Based Cameroonians To Contribute In Ending Anglophone Crisis

NEWS, Politics

By Neville Mesumbe

The Assistant Secretary at the U.S Bureau of African Affairs, Tibor Nagy has encouraged U.S-Based Cameroonians to contribute in ending the Cameroon Anglophone Crisis that has rocked the English Speaking Regions of the country for the past 4 years.

In a release dated November 6, the U.S diplomat said the Cameroonian diaspora in the United States can and must play a critical key role to end the violence in Cameroon.    

As a community, Tibor Nagy said their influence can be felt through public remarks, private conversations, remittances, international conferences, and social media posts,”

The diplomat further mentioned that the United States’ government considers the Cameroonian diaspora a critical community that can push for meaningful change in Cameroon to address long-term grievances, support the safety of humanitarian workers, get children back to school safely, and bring an end to the fighting that has led to untold suffering.

The diplomat further encouraged Cameroonians resident in the United States to use the power of their voices constructively to promote peace in Cameroon. According to Tibor Nagy, peace should be at the forefront of their utterances whenever they are engaging with Cameroonians worldwide, the U.S. government, Congress, and on social media.

However, the diplomat stated that the United States will not participate in any gathering organised to promote violence and hate speech. “We will not work with groups or attend diaspora-organised events that include calls for violence or hate speech.’’

According to Nagy, the United States supports the territorial integrity of Cameroon and calls for all actors to peacefully address the long-term grievances driving the current conflict in the Northwest and Southwest Regions and to cease exacerbating the hardships experienced by civilians in these regions.

The war rocking the Northwest and Southwest regions of the nation has led to severe hardship, untold suffering, fear and death. Human Rights Watch estimates that at least 285 civilians have been killed in about 190 incidents since January 2020 in the Northwest and Southwest regions.

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