Cheated ENAM Common-Law Candidates Threaten To Protest

NEWS, Society

Common-Law candidates who wrote the entrance exam into the National School of Administration and Magistracy (ENAM), and were sidelined in the special intake of 119 candidates ordered by the Presidency through the Prime Minister’s Office, have threatened to stage protests, if stakeholders continue to ignore their several complaints of discrimination lodged at the Presidency, the School and concerned Ministries.

The Common Law candidates’ appeal is anchored on a Presidential authorisation on September 18, made public by the Minister of Public Service and Administrative Reforms, ordering a special intake of an additional 119 candidates into ENAM. 

The candidates had earlier written to the Presidency, complaining that the intake of an additional 119 candidates, ordered by the President, was mired in fraud and outright discrimination. They revealed that, of the 119 candidates ordered to be added, the individuals at the helm of the exercise took only candidates of mainstream ENAM programmes and no candidate of the Common Law Department was taken.

“No candidate of the Common Law special recruitment of Magistrates and Court Registrars was added or absorbed in the list. Not even those on the waiting list as was the classic ENAM.”

Citing the on-going National Dialogue and talks of living together and ‘non-maginalisation’ of Anglophones, the candidates say they are crying for help, because they have been deliberately stigmatised and discriminated against, even at a time that a National Dialogue is convened to handle such daily, institutional and avoidable mishaps. 

In a letter to the Prime Minister, the candidates complained about being sidelined in the special intake, telling the PM that: “Such blatant injustice can only be done against your vigilance, which must have been so tactfully averted by its perpetrators as the case may be. This is the rationale of our appeal to you, to denounce that we feel cheated and robbed…”

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